How to resize a VirtualBox .vmdk file on MacOS

I’ve allocated 30GB for the Windows 10 VirtualBox virtual machine. That amount of storage was short-lived, I installed Visual Studio and a few other development tools, soon,e I needed to expend/resize the hard disk storage.

I’m running Oracle VM VirtualBox Version 5.1.28, the syntax might change in different version of VirtualBox but the steps are the same:

  • Start a Terminal session. Terminal program is located in Applications -> Utilities -> Terminals
  • My Windows 10 virtual hard disk is in the .vmdk format so I need to convert it to .vdk format first, else I will receive an error like this:
0%...
Progress state: VBOX_E_FILE_ERROR

Continue reading “How to resize a VirtualBox .vmdk file on MacOS”

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Virtualbox Virtual Machine Fullscreen

Virtualbox is Oracle‘s free Virtual Machine software. It’s fantastic, reliable and FREE! I’ve used it for a few years now and am loving it. I don’t install new virtual machines often but when I do, I struggle with the steps to enable the Virtual Machines to fullscreen mode. I’m writing this down now for future references.

The instuctions in the post assume that the virtual machine has been installed, for example, I would already done these tasks:

  1. donwloaded and installed the virtualbox software from Oracle
  2. downloaded and installed Windows 10 from Microsoft

Now, started the virtual machine and check if the virtual machine is shoing  a thick black frame around it when in fullscreen mode. It means that the virtual machine is not displaying the same size as the host machine when in fullscreen mode.

What needs to happen now is to download and install the “Oracle VM Virtual Machine Extension Pack”, then attached the Guest Addition (installed by installing the Extension Pack) as a CD image to the virtual machines so it can be installed locally on the virtual machines. Detailed steps are:
Continue reading “Virtualbox Virtual Machine Fullscreen”

Azure Spring Cleaning

I’m doing some Project Euler problems to brush up my coding skills – see if I still have got it. Just like riding a bicycle years later, I think years of training in the past had not left me yet. Just like cleaning up and oiling the old bicycle, I found myself trying to setup the coding environment again.

It’s been a few years since I’ve used my Azure Virtual Machines (VM) that were setup for coding. Most of the resources were in the classic pools. First thing first, start up the VMs one by one to see if the logins are still working. Do not start them all in case the account notifications go crazy – they are not free! I deleted the VMs that I could not logon and created some with the latest products such as Visual Studio 2017 and Windows 10. I’m impressed with the variety of Azure VM template options – there is the popular WordPress and even Linux operating systems.

The new, compare to the classic, version of the Azure dashboard takes a bit of time to get used to. The dashboard options can be a bit overwhelming to a user who is unfamiliar with the tools. One can always switch to the classic dashboard if unsure.

There are some options that only exist in the classic dashboard, e.g. move subscriptions between Azure Active Directories (AAD). I had one subscription transferred from an old email. I created a new AAD and put all my subscription under it as a way of centralise all accounts and controls for my Azure resources.

The geek in me is feeling the excitement. 🙂